Buy American Act - BAA Compliant LED Lighting

This information on the Buy American Act and BAA Compliant LED Lighting is to support U.S. Government Procurement Personnel, Specifiers, and Contractors.

The Buy American Act requires that a product be manufactured in the U.S. of more than 50 percent U.S. parts to be considered Made in USA for government procurement purposes.

25.101 General.

(a) The Buy American statute restricts the purchase of supplies that are not domestic end products. For manufactured end products, the Buy American statute uses a two-part test to define a domestic end product.

(1) The article must be manufactured in the United States; and

(2) The cost of domestic components must exceed 50 percent of the cost of all the components.

(Note: This section 25.101 (a) (1) + (2) is highlighted in bold italics for convenience in the comprehensive information below.)

 

Source: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2009-title41/html/USCODE-2009-title41-chap1-sec10a.htm

41 U.S.C. 
United States Code, 2009 Edition
Title 41 – PUBLIC CONTRACTS
CHAPTER 1 – GENERAL PROVISIONS
Sec. 10a – American materials required for public use
From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov

§10a. American materials required for public use

(A) IN GENERAL

Not withstanding any other provision of law, and unless the head of the department or independent establishment concerned shall determine it to be inconsistent with the public interest, or the cost to be unreasonable, only such unmanufactured articles, materials, and supplies as have been mined or produced in the United States, and only such manufactured articles, materials, and supplies as have been manufactured in the United States substantially all from articles, materials, or supplies mined, produced, or manufactured, as the case may be, in the United States, shall be acquired for public use. This section shall not apply with respect to articles, materials, or supplies for use outside the United States, or if articles, materials, or supplies of the class or kind to be used or the articles, materials, or supplies from which they are manufactured are not mined, produced, or manufactured, as the case may be, in the United States in sufficient and reasonably available commercial quantities and of a satisfactory quality. This section shall not apply to manufactured articles, materials, or supplies procured under any contract the award value of which is less than or equal to the micro-purchase threshold under section 428 of this title.
(b) Reports
(1) In general
Not later than 180 days after the end of each of fiscal years 2007 through 2011, the head of each Federal agency shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the House of Representatives a report on the amount of the acquisitions made by the agency in that fiscal year of articles, materials, or supplies purchased from entities that manufacture the articles, materials, or supplies outside of the United States.
(2) Contents of report

The report required by paragraph (1) shall separately include, for the fiscal year covered by such report—

(A) the dollar value of any articles, materials, or supplies that were manufactured outside the United States;

(B) an itemized list of all waivers granted with respect to such articles, materials, or supplies under this Act, and a citation to the treaty, international agreement, or other law under which each waiver was granted;

(C) if any articles, materials, or supplies were acquired from entities that manufacture articles, materials, or supplies outside the United States, the specific exception under this section that was used to purchase such articles, materials, or supplies; and

(D) a summary of—

(i) the total procurement funds expended on articles, materials, and supplies manufactured inside the United States; and

(ii) the total procurement funds expended on articles, materials, and supplies manufactured outside the United States.
(3) Public availability

The head of each Federal agency submitting a report under paragraph (1) shall make the report publicly available to the maximum extent practicable.
(4) Exception for intelligence community
This subsection shall not apply to acquisitions made by an agency, or component thereof, that is an element of the intelligence community as specified in, or designated under, section 401a(4) of title 50.

(Mar. 3, 1933, ch. 212, title III, §2, 47 Stat. 1520; Pub. L. 100–418, title VII, §7005(b), Aug. 23, 1988, 102 Stat. 1553; Pub. L. 103–355, title IV, §4301(b), Oct. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 3347; Pub. L. 110–28, title VIII, §8306, May 25, 2007, 121 Stat. 211.)
References in Text
This Act, referred to in subsec. (b)(2)(B), probably should be “this title”, meaning title III of act Mar. 3, 1933, ch. 212, 47 Stat. 1520, known as the Buy American Act, which is classified generally to sections 10a, 10b, and 10c of this title. For complete classification of title III to the Code, see Short Title note below and Tables.
Amendments
2007—Pub. L. 110–28 designated existing provisions as subsec. (a), inserted heading, and added subsec. (b).

1994—Pub. L. 103–355 inserted at end “This section shall not apply to manufactured articles, materials, or supplies procured under any contract the award value of which is less than or equal to the micro-purchase threshold under section 428 of this title.”

1988—Pub. L. 100–418, §§7004, 7005(b), temporarily substituted “Federal agency” for “department or independent establishment”. See Effective and Termination Dates of 1988 Amendment note below.
Effective Date of 1994 Amendment
Section 4301(c) of Pub. L. 103–355 provided that: “Notwithstanding any other provision of law—

“(1) section 32 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act [41 U.S.C. 428], as added by subsection (a); and

“(2) the amendment made by subsection (b) [amending this section];

shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act [Oct. 13, 1994] and shall be implemented in the Federal Acquisition Regulation not later than 60 days after such date of enactment.”
Effective and Termination Dates of 1988 Amendment

Section 7004 of title VII of Pub. L. 100–418 provided that: “The amendments made by this title [see Short Title of 1988 Amendment note below] shall cease to be effective on April 30, 1996, unless the Congress, after reviewing the report required by section 305(k) of the Trade Agreements Act of 1979 [former 19 U.S.C. 2515(k)], and other relevant information, extends such date. After such date, the President may modify or terminate any or all actions taken pursuant to such amendments.”

Section 7005(f) of title VII of Pub. L. 100–418 provided that: “The amendments made by this section [amending sections 10a, 10b, 10c, and 10d of this title and section 2511 of Title 19, Customs Duties] shall take effect upon enactment [Aug. 23, 1988].”
Short Title of 1988 Amendment
Section 7001 of title VII of Pub. L. 100–418 provided that: “This title [enacting section 10b–1 of this title, amending this section, sections 10b, 10c, and 10d of this title, and sections 2511 and 2515 of Title 19, Customs Duties, enacting provisions set out as notes under section 10a of this title, and amending provisions set out as notes under section 10c of this title] may be cited as the ‘Buy American Act of 1988’.”
Short Title
Section 7, formerly section 5, of title III of act Mar. 3, 1933, as added by Pub. L. 103–355, title X, §10005(f)(4), Oct. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 3409, and renumbered and amended by Pub. L. 104–106, div. D, title XLIII, §4321(a)(11), Feb. 10, 1996, 110 Stat. 671, provided that: “This title [enacting this section, sections 10b and 10c of this title, and provisions set out as notes under section 10c of this title] may be cited as the ‘Buy American Act’.”
Implementation of Buy American Act With Respect to Certain Water Resource Projects
Pub. L. 100–371, title V, §508, July 19, 1988, 102 Stat. 875, provided that:

“(a) General Rule.—For purposes of title III of the Act of March 3, 1933 (47 Stat. 1520; 41 U.S.C. 10a–10c) [41 U.S.C. 10a, 10b, 10b–1, 10c], commonly known as the Buy American Act, a cofferdam or any other temporary structure to be constructed by the Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, shall be treated in the same manner as a permanent dam constructed by the Secretary of the Army.

“(b) Applicability.—Subsection (a) shall only apply to contracts entered into after the date of the enactment of this Act [July 19, 1988].”
Exemption of Functions
Functions authorized by Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, as exempt, see Ex. Ord. No. 11223, eff. May 12, 1965, 30 F.R. 6635, set out as a note under section 2393 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.
Applicability of Buy American Act With Respect to European Community
For applicability of Buy American Act to procurements covered by agreement with the European Community on government procurement, see Ex. Ord. No. 12849, May 25, 1993, 58 F.R. 30931, set out as a note under section 2511 of Title 19, Customs Duties

Acquisition.gov

https://www.acquisition.gov/far/html/Subpart%2025_1.html

Subpart 25.1.Buy American.Supplies

25.100 Scope of subpart.

(a) This subpart implements.

(1) 41 U.S.C. chapter 83, Buy American;

(2) Executive Order 10582, December 17, 1954; and

(3) Waiver of the component test of the Buy American statute for acquisition of commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) items in accordance with 41 U.S.C 1907.

(b) It applies to supplies acquired for use in the United States, including supplies acquired under contracts set aside for small business concerns, if.

(1) The supply contract exceeds the micro-purchase threshold; or

(2) The supply portion of a contract for services that involves the furnishing of supplies (e.g., lease) exceeds the micro-purchase threshold.

25.101 General.

(a) The Buy American statute restricts the purchase of supplies that are not domestic end products. For manufactured end products, the Buy American statute uses a two-part test to define a domestic end product.

(1) The article must be manufactured in the United States; and

(2) The cost of domestic components must exceed 50 percent of the cost of all the components. In accordance with 41 U.S.C 1907, this component test of the Buy American statute has been waived for acquisitions of COTS items (see 12.505(a)).

(b) The Buy American statute applies to small business set-asides. A manufactured product of a small business concern is a U.S.-made end product, but is not a domestic end product unless it meets the component test in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(c) Exceptions that allow the purchase of a foreign end product are listed at 25.103. The unreasonable cost exception is implemented through the use of an evaluation factor applied to low foreign offers that are not eligible offers. The evaluation factor is not used to provide a preference for one foreign offer over another. Evaluation procedures and examples are provided in Subpart 25.5.

25.102 Policy.

Except as provided in 25.103, acquire only domestic end products for public use inside the United States.

25.103 Exceptions.

When one of the following exceptions applies, the contracting officer may acquire a foreign end product without regard to the restrictions of the Buy American statute:

(a) Public interest. The head of the agency may make a determination that domestic preference would be inconsistent with the public interest. This exception applies when an agency has an agreement with a foreign government that provides a blanket exception to the Buy American Act.

(b) Nonavailability. The Buy American statute does not apply with respect to articles, materials, or supplies if articles, materials, or supplies of the class or kind to be acquired, either as end items or components, are not mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States in sufficient and reasonably available commercial quantities and of a satisfactory quality.

(1) Class determinations.

(i) A nonavailability determination has been made for the articles listed in 25.104. This determination does not necessarily mean that there is no domestic source for the listed items, but that domestic sources can only meet 50 percent or less of total U.S. Government and nongovernment demand.

(ii) Before acquisition of an article on the list, the procuring agency is responsible to conduct market research appropriate to the circumstances, including seeking of domestic sources. This applies to acquisition of an article as.

(A) An end product; or

(B) A significant component (valued at more than 50 percent of the value of all the components).

(iii) The determination in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section does not apply if the contracting officer learns at any time before the time designated for receipt of bids in sealed bidding or final offers in negotiation that an article on the list is available domestically in sufficient and reasonably available commercial quantities of a satisfactory quality to meet the requirements of the solicitation. The contracting officer must.

(A) Ensure that the appropriate Buy American statute provision and clause are included in the solicitation (see 22.1101(a), 22.1101(b), or 25.1102);

(B) Specify in the solicitation that the article is available domestically and that offerors and contractors may not treat foreign components of the same class or kind as domestic components; and

(C) Submit a copy of supporting documentation to the appropriate council identified in 1.201-1, in accordance with agency procedures, for possible removal of the article from the list.

(2) Individual determinations.

(i) The head of the contracting activity may make a determination that an article, material, or supply is not mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States in sufficient and reasonably available commercial quantities of a satisfactory quality.

(ii) If the contracting officer considers that the nonavailability of an article is likely to affect future acquisitions, the contracting officer may submit a copy of the determination and supporting documentation to the appropriate council identified in 1.201-1, in accordance with agency procedures, for possible addition to the list in 25.104.

(3) A written determination is not required if all of the following conditions are present:

(i) The acquisition was conducted through use of full and open competition.

(ii) The acquisition was synopsized in accordance with 5.201.

(iii) No offer for a domestic end product was received.

(c) Unreasonable cost. The contracting officer may determine that the cost of a domestic end product would be unreasonable, in accordance with 25.105 and Subpart 25.5.

(d) Resale. The contracting officer may purchase foreign end products specifically for commissary resale.

(e) Information technology that is a commercial item. The restriction on purchasing foreign end products does not apply to the acquisition of information technology that is a commercial item, when using fiscal year 2004 or subsequent fiscal year funds (Section 535(a) of Division F, Title V, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2004, and similar sections in subsequent appropriations acts).

25.104 Nonavailable articles.

(a) The following articles have been determined to be nonavailable in accordance with 25.103(b)(1)(i):

Acetylene, black.

Agar, bulk.

Anise.

Antimony, as metal or oxide.

Asbestos, amosite, chrysotile, and crocidolite.

Bamboo shoots.

Bananas.

Bauxite.

Beef, corned, canned.

Beef extract.

Bephenium hydroxynapthoate.

Bismuth.

Books, trade, text, technical, or scientific; newspapers; pamphlets; magazines; periodicals; printed briefs and films; not printed in the United States and for which domestic editions are not available.

Brazil nuts, unroasted

Cadmium, ores and flue dust.

Calcium cyanamide.

Capers.

Cashew nuts.

Castor beans and castor oil.

Chalk, English.

Chestnuts.

Chicle.

Chrome ore or chromite.

Cinchona bark.

Cobalt, in cathodes, rondelles, or other primary ore and metal forms.

Cocoa beans.

Coconut and coconut meat, unsweetened, in shredded, desiccated, or similarly prepared form.

Coffee, raw or green bean.

Colchicine alkaloid, raw.

Copra.

Cork, wood or bark and waste.

Cover glass, microscope slide.

Crane rail (85-pound per foot).

Cryolite, natural.

Dammar gum.

Diamonds, industrial, stones and abrasives.

Emetine, bulk.

Ergot, crude.

Erythrityl tetranitrate.

Fair linen, altar.

Fibers of the following types: abaca, abace, agave, coir, flax, jute, jute burlaps, palmyra, and sisal.

Goat and kidskins.

Goat hair canvas.

Grapefruit sections, canned.

Graphite, natural, crystalline, crucible grade.

Hand file sets (Swiss pattern).

Handsewing needles.

Hemp yarn.

Hog bristles for brushes.

Hyoscine, bulk.

Ipecac, root.

Iodine, crude.

Kaurigum.

Lac.

Leather, sheepskin, hair type.

Lavender oil.

Manganese.

Menthol, natural bulk.

Mica.

Microprocessor chips (brought onto a Government construction site as separate units for incorporation into building systems during construction or repair and alteration of real property).

Modacrylic fiber.

Nickel, primary, in ingots, pigs, shots, cathodes, or similar forms; nickel oxide and nickel salts.

Nitroguanidine (also known as picrite).

Nux vomica, crude.

Oiticica oil.

Olive oil.

Olives (green), pitted or unpitted, or stuffed, in bulk.

Opium, crude.

Oranges, mandarin, canned.

Petroleum, crude oil, unfinished oils, and finished products.

Pine needle oil.

Pineapple, canned.

Platinum and related group metals, refined, as sponge, powder, ingots, or cast bars.

Pyrethrum flowers.

Quartz crystals.

Quebracho.

Quinidine.

Quinine.

Rabbit fur felt.

Radium salts, source and special nuclear materials.

Rosettes.

Rubber, crude and latex.

Rutile.

Santonin, crude.

Secretin.

Shellac.

Silk, raw and unmanufactured.

Spare and replacement parts for equipment of foreign manufacture, and for which domestic parts are not available.

Spices and herbs, in bulk.

Sugars, raw.

Swords and scabbards.

Talc, block, steatite.

Tantalum.

Tapioca flour and cassava.

Tartar, crude; tartaric acid and cream of tartar in bulk.

Tea in bulk.

Thread, metallic (gold).

Thyme oil.

Tin in bars, blocks, and pigs.

Triprolidine hydrochloride.

Tungsten.

Vanilla beans.

Venom, cobra.

Water chestnuts.

Wax, carnauba.

Wire glass.

Woods; logs, veneer, and lumber of the following species: Alaskan yellow cedar, angelique, balsa, ekki, greenheart, lignum vitae, mahogany, and teak.

Yarn, 50 Denier rayon.

Yeast, active dry and instant active dry.

(b) This list will be published in the Federal Register for public comment no less frequently than once every five years. Unsolicited recommendations for deletions from this list may be submitted at any time and should provide sufficient data and rationale to permit evaluation (see 1.502).

25.000 Scope of part.

(a) This part provides policies and procedures for.

(1) Acquisition of foreign supplies, services, and construction materials; and

(2) Contracts performed outside the United States.

(b) It implements 41 U.S.C. chapter 83, Buy American; trade agreements; and other laws and regulations.

25.001 General.

(a) 41 U.S.C. chapter 83, Buy American.

(1) Restricts the purchase of supplies, that are not domestic end products, for use within the United States. A foreign end product may be purchased if the contracting officer determines that the price of the lowest domestic offer is unreasonable or if another exception applies (see Subpart 25.1); and

(2) Requires, with some exceptions, the use of only domestic construction materials in contracts for construction in the United States (see Subpart 25.2).

(b) The restrictions in the Buy American statute are not applicable in acquisitions subject to certain trade agreements (see Subpart 25.4). In these acquisitions, end products and construction materials from certain countries receive nondiscriminatory treatment in evaluation with domestic offers. Generally, the dollar value of the acquisition determines which of the trade agreements applies. Exceptions to the applicability of the trade agreements are described in Subpart 25.4.

(c) The test to determine the country of origin for an end product under the Buy American statute (see the various country “end product” definitions in 25.003) is different from the test to determine the country of origin for an end product under the trade agreements, or the criteria for the representation on end products manufactured outside the United States (see 52.225-18).

(1) The Buy American statute uses a two-part test to define a “domestic end product”or “domestic construction material” (manufactured in the United States and a formula based on cost of domestic components). The component test has been waived for acquisition of commercially available off-the-shelf items.

(2) Under the trade agreements, the test to determine country of origin is “substantial transformation” (i.e., transforming an article into a new and different article of commerce, with a name, character, or use distinct from the original article).

(3) For the representation at 52.225-18, the only criterion is whether the place of manufacture of an end product is in the United States or outside the United States, without regard to the origin of the components.

(4) When using funds appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111-5), the definition of “domestic manufactured construction material” requires manufacture in the United States but does not include a requirement with regard to the origin of the components. If the construction material consists wholly or predominantly of iron or steel, the iron or steel must be produced in the United States.

25.002 Applicability of subparts.

The following table shows the applicability of the subparts. Subpart 25.5 provides comprehensive procedures for offer evaluation and examples.

SubpartSupplies for UseConstruction

Services Performed

Inside U.S.Outside U.S.Inside U.S.Outside U.S.Inside U.S.Outside U.S.
25.1 Buy American.
Supplies
X.....
25.2 Buy American.
Construction Materials
..X...
25.3 Contracts Performed Outside the United States.X.X.X
25.4 Trade AgreementsXXXXXX
25.5 Evaluating Foreign Offers.
Supply Contracts
XX....
25.6 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.Buy American statute.Construction Materials  X   
25.7 Prohibited SourcesXXXXXX
25.8 Other International Agreements and CoordinationXX.X.X
25.9 Customs and DutiesX.....
25.10 Additional Foreign Acquisition RegulationsXXXXXX
25.11 Solicitation Provisions and Contract ClausesXXXXXX

25.003 Definitions.

As used in this part.

“Caribbean Basin country” means any of the following countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Curacao, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saba, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten, or Trinidad and Tobago.

“Caribbean Basin country end product”.

(1) Means an article that.

(i)(A) Is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of a Caribbean Basin country; or

(B) In the case of an article that consists in whole or in part of materials from another country, has been substantially transformed in a Caribbean Basin country into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed; and

(ii) Is not excluded from duty-free treatment for Caribbean countries under 19 U.S.C. 2703(b).

(A) For this reason, the following articles are not Caribbean Basin country end products:

(1) Tuna, prepared or preserved in any manner in airtight containers.

(2) Petroleum, or any product derived from petroleum.

(3) Watches and watch parts (including cases, bracelets, and straps) of whatever type including, but not limited to, mechanical, quartz digital, or quartz analog, if such watches or watch parts contain any material that is the product of any country to which the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) column 2 rates of duty apply (i.e., Afghanistan, Cuba, Laos, North Korea, and Vietnam).

(4) Certain of the following: textiles and apparel articles; footwear, handbags, luggage, flat goods, work gloves, and leather wearing apparel; or handloomed, handmade, and folklore articles.

(B) Access to the HTSUS to determine duty-free status of articles of the types listed in paragraph (1)(ii)(A)(4) of this definition is available via the Internet at http://www.usitc.gov/tata/hts/. In particular, see the following:

(1) General Note 3(c), Products Eligible for Special Tariff treatment.

(2) General Note 17, Products of Countries Designated as Beneficiary Countries under the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act of 2000.

(3) Section XXII, Chapter 98, Subchapter II, Articles Exported and Returned, Advanced or Improved Abroad, U.S. Note 7(b).

(4) Section XXII, Chapter 98, Subchapter XX, Goods Eligible for Special Tariff Benefits under the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act; and

(2) Refers to a product offered for purchase under a supply contract, but for purposes of calculating the value of the acquisition, includes services (except transportation services) incidental to the article, provided that the value of those incidental services does not exceed that of the article itself.

“Civil aircraft and related articles” means.

(1) All aircraft other than aircraft to be purchased for use by the Department of Defense or the U.S. Coast Guard;

(2) The engines (and parts and components for incorporation into the engines) of these aircraft;

(3) Any other parts, components, and subassemblies for incorporation into the aircraft; and

(4) Any ground flight simulators, and parts and components of these simulators, for use with respect to the aircraft, whether to be used as original or replacement equipment in the manufacture, repair, maintenance, rebuilding, modification, or conversion of the aircraft and without regard to whether the aircraft or articles receive duty-free treatment under section 601(a)(2) of the Trade Agreements Act.

“Component” means an article, material, or supply incorporated directly into an end product or construction material.

“Construction material” means an article, material, or supply brought to the construction site by a contractor or subcontractor for incorporation into the building or work. The term also includes an item brought to the site preassembled from articles, materials, or supplies. However, emergency life safety systems, such as emergency lighting, fire alarm, and audio evacuation systems, that are discrete systems incorporated into a public building or work and that are produced as complete systems, are evaluated as a single and distinct construction material regardless of when or how the individual parts or components of those systems are delivered to the construction site. Materials purchased directly by the Government are supplies, not construction material.

“Cost of components” means.

(1) For components purchased by the contractor, the acquisition cost, including transportation costs to the place of incorporation into the end product or construction material (whether or not such costs are paid to a domestic firm), and any applicable duty (whether or not a duty-free entry certificate is issued); or

(2) For components manufactured by the contractor, all costs associated with the manufacture of the component, including transportation costs as described in paragraph (1) of this definition, plus allocable overhead costs, but excluding profit. Cost of components does not include any costs associated with the manufacture of the end product.

“Designated country” means any of the following countries:

(1) A World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement (WTO GPA) country (Armenia, Aruba, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic of), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan (known in the World Trade Organization as “the Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan, Penghu, Kinmen and Matsu (Chinese Taipei)”), Ukraine, or United Kingdom);

(2) A Free Trade Agreement (FTA) country (Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or Singapore);

(3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, or Zambia); or

(4) A Caribbean Basin country (Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Curacao, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saba, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten, or Trinidad and Tobago).

“Designated country end product” means a WTO GPA country end product, an FTA country end product, a least developed country end product, or a Caribbean Basin country end product.

“Domestic construction material” means.

(1)(i) An unmanufactured construction material mined or produced in the United States;

(ii) A construction material manufactured in the United States, if.

(A) The cost of the components mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States exceeds 50 percent of the cost of all its components. Components of foreign origin of the same class or kind for which nonavailability determinations have been made are treated as domestic; or

(B) The construction material is a COTS item;

(2) Except that for use in subpart 25.6, see the definition in 25.601.

“Domestic end product” means.

(1) An unmanufactured end product mined or produced in the United States;

(2) An end product manufactured in the United States, if.

(i) The cost of its components mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States exceeds 50 percent of the cost of all its components. Components of foreign origin of the same class or kind as those that the agency determines are not mined, produced, or manufactured in sufficient and reasonably available commercial quantities of a satisfactory quality are treated as domestic. Scrap generated, collected, and prepared for processing in the United States is considered domestic; or

(ii) The end product is a COTS item.

“Domestic offer” means an offer of a domestic end product. When the solicitation specifies that award will be made on a group of line items, a domestic offer means an offer where the proposed price of the domestic end products exceeds 50 percent of the total proposed price of the group.

“Eligible offer” means an offer of an eligible product. When the solicitation specifies that award will be made on a group of line items, an eligible offer means a foreign offer where the combined proposed price of the eligible products and the domestic end products exceeds 50 percent of the total proposed price of the group.

“Eligible product” means a foreign end product, construction material, or service that, due to applicability of a trade agreement to a particular acquisition, is not subject to discriminatory treatment.

“End product” means those articles, materials, and supplies to be acquired for public use.

“Foreign construction material” means a construction material other than a domestic construction material.

“Foreign contractor” means a contractor or subcontractor organized or existing under the laws of a country other than the United States.

“Foreign end product” means an end product other than a domestic end product.

“Foreign offer” means any offer other than a domestic offer.

“Free Trade Agreement country” means Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or Singapore.

“Free Trade Agreement country end product” means an article that.

(1) Is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) country; or

(2) In the case of an article that consists in whole or in part of materials from another country, has been substantially transformed in an FTA country into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed. The term refers to a product offered for purchase under a supply contract, but for purposes of calculating the value of the end product, includes services (except transportation services) incidental to the article, provided that the value of those incidental services does not exceed that of the article itself.

“Israeli end product” means an article that.

(1) Is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of Israel; or

(2) In the case of an article that consists in whole or in part of materials from another country, has been substantially transformed in Israel into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed.

“Least developed country” means any of the following countries: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Yemen, or Zambia.

“Least developed country end product” means an article that.

(1) Is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of a least developed country; or

(2) In the case of an article that consists in whole or in part of materials from another country, has been substantially transformed in a least developed country into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed. The term refers to a product offered for purchase under a supply contract, but for purposes of calculating the value of the end product, includes services (except transportation services) incidental to the article, provided that the value of those incidental services does not exceed that of the article itself.

“Noneligible offer” means an offer of a noneligible product.

“Noneligible product” means a foreign end product that is not an eligible product.

“United States” means the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and outlying areas.

“U.S.-made end product” means an article that is mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States or that is substantially transformed in the United States into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed.

“World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement (WTO GPA) country” means any of the following countries: Armenia, Aruba, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea (Republic of), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Ukraine, or United Kingdom.

“WTO GPA country end product” means an article that.

(1) Is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of a WTO GPA country; or

(2) In the case of an article that consists in whole or in part of materials from another country, has been substantially transformed in a WTO GPA country into a new and different article of commerce with a name, character, or use distinct from that of the article or articles from which it was transformed. The term refers to a product offered for purchase under a supply contract, but for purposes of calculating the value of the end product includes services (except transportation services) incidental to the article, provided that the value of those incidental services does not exceed that of the article itself.

25.105 Determining reasonableness of cost.

(a) The contracting officer.

(1) Must use the evaluation factors in paragraph (b) of this section unless the head of the agency makes a written determination that the use of higher factors is more appropriate. If the determination applies to all agency acquisitions, the agency evaluation factors must be published in agency regulations; and

(2) Must not apply evaluation factors to offers of eligible products if the acquisition is subject to a trade agreement under Subpart 25.4.

(b) If there is a domestic offer that is not the low offer, and the restrictions of the Buy American statute apply to the low offer, the contracting officer must determine the reasonableness of the cost of the domestic offer by adding to the price of the low offer, inclusive of duty.

(1) 6 percent, if the lowest domestic offer is from a large business concern; or

(2) 12 percent, if the lowest domestic offer is from a small business concern. The contracting officer must use this factor, or another factor established in agency regulations, in small business set-asides if the low offer is from a small business concern offering the product of a small business concern that is not a domestic end product (see Subpart 19.5).

(c) The price of the domestic offer is reasonable if it does not exceed the evaluated price of the low offer after addition of the appropriate evaluation factor in accordance with paragraph (a) or (b) of this section. (See evaluation procedures at Subpart 25.5.)

Subpart 12.5.Applicability of Certain Laws to the Acquisition of Commercial Items and Commercially Available Off-The-Shelf Items

12.500 Scope of subpart.

(a) As required by 41 U.S.C. 1906 and 1907, this subpart lists provisions of law that are not applicable to.

(1) Contracts for the acquisition of commercial items;

(2) Subcontracts, at any tier, for the acquisition of commercial items; and

(3) Contracts and subcontracts, at any tier, for the acquisition of COTS items.

(b) This subpart also lists provisions of law that have been amended to eliminate or modify their applicability to either contracts or subcontracts for the acquisition of commercial items.

12.501 Applicability.

(a) This subpart applies to any contract or subcontract at any tier for the acquisition of commercial items.

(b) Nothing in this subpart shall be construed to authorize the waiver of any provision of law with respect to any subcontract if the prime contractor is reselling or distributing commercial items of another contractor without adding value. This limitation is intended to preclude establishment of unusual contractual arrangements solely for the purpose of Government sales.

(c) For purposes of this subpart, contractors awarded subcontracts under subpart 19.8, Contracting with the Small Business Administration (the 8(a) Program), shall be considered prime contractors.
ADDITIONAL Information: From Acquisition.GOV
https://www.acquisition.gov/far/html/Subpart%2012_5.html#wp1077123

12.502 Procedures.

(a) The FAR prescription for the provision or clause for each of the laws listed in 12.503 has been revised in the appropriate part to reflect its proper application to prime contracts for the acquisition of commercial items.

(b) For subcontracts for the acquisition of commercial items or commercial components, the clauses at 52.212-5, Contract Terms and Conditions Required to Implement Statutes or Executive Orders.Commercial Items, and 52.244-6, Subcontracts for Commercial Items, reflect the applicability of the laws listed in 12.504 by identifying the only provisions and clauses that are required to be included in a subcontract at any tier for the acquisition of commercial items or commercial components.

(c) The FAR prescription for the provision or clause for each of the laws listed in 12.505 has been revised in the appropriate part to reflect its proper application to contracts and subcontracts for the acquisition of COTS items.

12.503 Applicability of certain laws to Executive agency contracts for the acquisition of commercial items.

(a) The following laws are not applicable to Executive agency contracts for the acquisition of commercial items:

(1) 41 U.S.C. chapter 65, Contracts for Materials, Supplies, Articles, and Equipment Exceeding $15,000 (see subpart 22.6).

(2) 41 U.S.C. 3901(b) and 10 U.S.C. 2306(b), Contingent Fees (see 3.404).

(3) 41 U.S.C. 1708(e)(3), Minimum Response Time for Offers (see 5.203).

(4) 41 U.S.C. chapter 81, Drug-Free Workplace (see 23.501).

(5) 31 U.S.C. 1354(a), Limitation on use of appropriated funds for contracts with entities not meeting veterans’ employment reporting requirements (see 22.1302).

(6) [Reserved]

(7) Section 806(a)(3) of Pub. L. 102-190, as amended by Sections 2091 and 8105 of Pub. L. 103-355, (10 U.S.C. 2302 note), Payment Protections for Subcontractors and Suppliers (see 28.106-6).

(8) 41 U.S.C. 4706(d)(1) and 10 U.S.C. 2313(c)(1), GAO Access to Contractor Employees, Section 871 of Pub. L. 110-417 (see 52.214-26 and 52.215-2).

(9) 41 U.S.C. 2303, Policy on Personal Conflicts of Interest by Contractor Employees (see subpart 3.11).

(b) Certain requirements of the following laws are not applicable to executive agency contracts for the acquisition of commercial items:

(1) 40 U.S.C. chapter 37, Requirement for a certificate and clause under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards statute (see 22.305).

(2) 41 U.S.C. 8703 and 8703, Requirement for a clause and certain other requirements related to kickbacks (see 3.502).

(3) 49 U.S.C. 40118, Requirement for a clause under the Fly American provisions (see 47.405).

(c) The applicability of the following laws have been modified in regards to Executive agency contracts for the acquisition of commercial items:

(1) 41 U.S.C. 4704 and 10 U.S.C. 2402, Prohibition on Limiting Subcontractor Direct Sales to the United States (see 3.503).

(2) 41 U.S.C. chapter 35, Truthful Cost or Pricing Data, and 10 U.S.C. 2306a, Truth in Negotiations Act (see 15.403).

(3) 41 U.S.C. chapter 15, Cost Accounting Standards (48 CFR Chapter 99) (see 12.214).

12.504 Applicability of certain laws to subcontracts for the acquisition of commercial items.

(a) The following laws are not applicable to subcontracts at any tier for the acquisition of commercial items or commercial components at any tier:

(1) 10 U.S.C. 2631, Transportation of Supplies by Sea (except for the types of subcontracts listed at 47.504(d)).

(2) 15 U.S.C. 644(d), Requirements relative to labor surplus areas under the Small Business Act (see subpart 19.2).

(3) [Reserved]

(4) 41 U.S.C. 6505, Contracts for Materials, Supplies, Articles, and Equipment Exceeding $15,000 (see subpart 22.6).

(5) 41 U.S.C. 4703, Validation of Proprietary Data restrictions (see subpart 27.4).

(6) 41 U.S.C. 3901(b) and 10 U.S.C. 2306(b), Contingent Fees (see subpart 3.4).

(7) 41 U.S.C. 4706(d) and 10 U.S.C. 2313(c), Examination of Records of Contractor, when a subcontractor is not required to provide certified cost or pricing data (see15.209(b)), unless using funds appropriated or otherwise made available by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111-5).

(8) 41 U.S.C. 1708(e)(3), Minimum Response Time for Offers (see subpart 5.2).

(9) 41 U.S.C. 2302, Rights in Technical Data (see subpart 27.4).

(10) 41 U.S.C. chapter 81, Drug-Free Workplace Act (see subpart 23.5).

(11) 46 U.S.C. App. 1241(b), Transportation in American Vessels of Government Personnel and Certain Cargo (see subpart 47.5) (except for the types of subcontracts listed at 47.504(d)).

(12) 49 U.S.C. 40118, Fly American provisions (see subpart 47.4).

(13) Section 806(a)(3) of Pub. L. 102-190, as amended by Sections 2091 and 8105 of Pub. L. 103-355 (10 U.S.C. 2302 note), Payment Protections for Subcontractors and Suppliers (see 28.106-6).

(b) The requirements for a certificate and clause under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards statute, 40 U.S.C. 37, (see subpart 22.3) are not applicable to subcontracts at any tier for the acquisition of commercial items or commercial components.

(c) The applicability of the following laws has been modified in regards to subcontracts at any tier for the acquisition of commercial items or commercial components:

(1) 41 U.S.C. 4704 and 10 U.S.C. 2402, Prohibition on Limiting Subcontractor Direct Sales to the United States (see subpart 3.5).

(2) 41 U.S.C. chapter 35, Truthful Cost or Pricing Data, and 10 U.S.C. 2306a, Truth in Negotiations (see subpart 15.4).

(3) 41 U.S.C. chapter 15, Cost Accounting Standards (48 CFR Chapter 99) (see 12.214).

12.505 Applicability of certain laws to contracts for the acquisition of COTS items.

COTS items are a subset of commercial items. Therefore, any laws listed in sections 12.503 and 12.504 are also inapplicable or modified in their applicability to contracts or subcontracts for the acquisition of COTS items. In addition, the following laws are not applicable to contracts for the acquisition of COTS items:

(a)(1) The portion of 41 U.S.C. 8302(a)(1), that reads “substantially all from articles, materials, or supplies mined, produced, or manufactured, in the United States,” Buy American- Supplies, component test (see 52.225-1 and 52.225-3).

(2) The portion of 41 U.S.C. 8303(a)(2), that reads “substantially all from articles, materials, or supplies mined, produced, or manufactured in the United States,” Buy American- Construction Materials, component test (see 52.225-9 and 52.225-11).

(b) 42 U.S.C. 6962(c)(3)(A), Certification and Estimate of Percentage of Recovered Material.

(c) Compliance Plan and Certification Requirement, section 1703 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Pub. L. 112-239), Title XVII, Ending trafficking in Government Contracting (see 52.222-50(h) and 52.222-56).

Subpart 25.1.Buy American.Supplies

(a) The Buy American statute restricts the purchase of supplies that are not domestic end products. For manufactured end products, the Buy American statute uses a two-part test to define a domestic end product.

(1) The article must be manufactured in the United States; and

(2) The cost of domestic components must exceed 50 percent of the cost of all the components. In accordance with 41 U.S.C 1907, this component test of the Buy American statute has been waived for acquisitions of COTS items (see 12.505(a)).

(b) The Buy American statute applies to small business set-asides. A manufactured product of a small business concern is a U.S.-made end product, but is not a domestic end product unless it meets the component test in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(c) Exceptions that allow the purchase of a foreign end product are listed at 25.103. The unreasonable cost exception is implemented through the use of an evaluation factor applied to low foreign offers that are not eligible offers. The evaluation factor is not used to provide a preference for one foreign offer over another. Evaluation procedures and examples are provided in Subpart 25.5.